Course: Reading and interpreting linguistic texts in English

« Back
Course title Reading and interpreting linguistic texts in English
Course code KAJ/LTA
Organizational form of instruction Seminar
Level of course Bachelor
Year of study not specified
Semester Winter
Number of ECTS credits 3
Language of instruction English
Status of course unspecified
Form of instruction Face-to-face
Work placements This is not an internship
Recommended optional programme components None
Lecturer(s)
  • Mišterová Ivona, PhDr. Ph.D.
Course content
The aim of this course, created for first-year students enrolled in the Linguistics master's degree, is to acquaint the listener with the significant characters, concepts, and approaches of British and American linguistics using authentic text material. Over the seminars, extracts from original British and American linguistic texts will be analyzed and commented on, either in a general or specific scientific context. Attention will be given to the concepts of British linguistic schools and their important members, e.g. the founder of the London School of Linguistics John Rupert Firth, Firth's successors, the Australian linguist M.A.K. Halliday, and others. Texts by David Crystal, John Lyons, Peter Matthews, and others will also be a subject of analysis. Texts written by American linguists will also be analyzed, e.g. texts from Naom Chomsky, Charles J. Fillmore (Case Grammar), Arnold M. Zwicky (who coined the term "Recency Illusion"), female American linguists Barbara J. Gross, Janet Breckenridge Pierrehumbert, Julie Hirschberg, and others. The analysis of authentic British and American texts will be aimed at the area of general linguistics, namely syntax, stylistics, and semantics, with a stress on the comparative view of British and American linguistics, showing both their homogeneous and heterogeneous processes. Students will also work with linguistic periodicals, for example the Journal of Linguistics.

Learning activities and teaching methods
Seminar
  • Contact hours - 39 hours per semester
  • Preparation for formative assessments (2-20) - 15 hours per semester
  • Preparation for comprehensive test (10-40) - 25 hours per semester
prerequisite
professional knowledge
No prerequisite courses.
learning outcomes
Students will be able to: - identify the significant characters, concepts, and approaches of British and American linguistics, - analyse and comment on extracts from authentic British and American linguistic texts, either in a general or specific scientific context, - describe the concepts of British linguistic schools and their important members, - describe the concepts of American linguistic schools and their important members, - analyse authentic British and American texts with a stress on the the area of general linguistics, namely syntax, stylistics, and semantics, - differentiate between British and American linguistics.
teaching methods
Seminar
assessment methods
Test
Recommended literature
  • BIBER, D. Longman Grammar of Spoken and Written English. Essex: Longman, 1999.
  • BRANDOM, R. B. Articulating Reasons. An Introduction to Inferentialism.. Cambridge, London: Harvard University Press, 2000.
  • BROE, M.; BRECKENRIDGE PIERREHUMBERT, J. Acquisition and the Lexicon.. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
  • Crystal, D. English as a Global Language.. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.
  • FILLMORE, Ch. J. The Case for Case. In Bach and Harms (ed): Universals in Linguistic Theory.. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1968.
  • HALLIDAY, M.A.K.; MATTHIESSEN, C.M.I.M. An Introduction to Functional Grammar. 3rd ed.. London: Arnold, 2004.
  • HARRIS, R. Linguistic Thought in England 1914-1945.. London: Duckworth, 1988.
  • Chomsky, N. New Horizons in the Study of Language and Mind.. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
  • LYONS, J. Natural Language and Universal Grammar: Essays in Linguistic Theory.. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991.


Study plans that include the course
Faculty Study plan (Version) Branch of study Category Recommended year of study Recommended semester